Beawander

Beawander

[bee-won-der]
noun
  1. The documented wanderings of Bea. Mostly to let her family and friends back home know she’s still alive, but partly so she can remember herself. 
Useful Thai Phrases: Food, Night Markets & Massage

Useful Thai Phrases: Food, Night Markets & Massage

4 min read

My brother told me that the sentence structure in Thai is quite similar to Chinese, so I shouldn’t have a hard time picking up Thai.

Boy, was he wrong!

In the 2 weeks that I’ve been here, I’ve only used the two phrases that most people know when learning a new language – Hello and Thank you.

I thought about taking language classes but since I only wanted to learn a few phrases here and there, I enlisted the help of my new local Thai friend – Mew!

I met her at my gym – she works the front desk 🙂 I asked her to teach me the useful phrases so I can survive in the next few months. 

I’ll keep adding to the list below and will highlight the ones I use often in red! 

When I was looking into seriously learning Thai, here were some of the resources that others referred me to:

My phonetic sounds might be wrong, but it’s how I can remember to say it, so sue me!

I know the 4 tones in Mandarin, that helps me in navigating the 4 tones in Thai. Apparently, there are 9 tones in Cantonese, but I have no idea what they all are!

Hello or Goodbye 

Sa-wa-dee-ka 

Notes: Just like in Japan, there is a different way of saying it if you are male or female. Naturally, I only learned the female way…I’m so happy that this does not exist in Chinese.

Thank You (for a female)

Krob-Kun-Ka

Notes: I have trouble saying this…the “kr” sound throws me off. Most of the time, I just end up speaking English. Bad farang!

End of sentence – period or question mark

Ka1 (.)

Ka2 (?)

Notes: Just like in Japanese “Desu vs Desu ka?”

Foreigner (specifically Caucasians)

Fa1-Rang3

Notes: Mew said I don’t count as a Farang…I am Chinese.

Chinese 

Con Jin

Notes: People + China = Chinese

Canadian / Americian

Con Ka-Na-Da / Con A-Me-Ri-Ca

 

I/Me

Chan2 (Women) / Pom (Man)

Cute Guy / Cute Girl
 
Lor3 / Shui3
 

Yes / No 

Chai1 / Mai4

Can’t Do

Mai4 Dai1

Ordering Food

No spicy

Mai4 Ped

Notes: Enunciate the ‘d’ in ‘ped’

What is good (on the menu)?
 
Anay3 aroy3 ka?
 
OR
 
Menu-nai3 aroy3 ka?
 
One More
 
Will ask Mew!
 

Can I get the bill, please?

Git Dang1 (or Ngoon1) Dui4 Ka2?

OR

Check Bin1 Noi3 Ka2?

Money – two ways of saying it

N(g)oon or Dang

Excuse me (…can I order?)

Khor3 Toad4 Ka1

Notes: Used at a restaurant…again, the “kh” sound throws me off

Calling the waiter (women)

Nong Ka, Nong Ka (if they are younger than you)

OR

Pi Ka, Pi Ka (if they are older than you)

Full / I’m Full

Inm3 / Inm3 Liao3 Ka1 

Hungry / I’m Hungry

Hew2 / Hew2 Liao3 Ka1

Delicious / Yummy
 
A-roy3
 

 

Water

Nam2

Noodle

Guai2 Dtiow2

Means: apparently it was derived from Chinese…

Rice

Kaw1

 

Fried

Pad(n)3

Notes: This means that PAD THAI is fried!!  

Ice

Nam2 Kang3

Dessert

Ka3nom2

Spoon / Fork

Chon2 / Som1

 
 
Vegetables
 
Pug
 

Fruits

Pon3 La1 Mai2

Vegetarian

Jay

Chicken

Gai

Fish
pblah3
 
Beef
nua2 wo3
 
Lamb
gek4
 
Pork
moo3
 
Meat
nua2
 
Duck
pbed3
 

Bargaining at Local Markets

Can I get a discount?

Lood4 Dai4 Mai2 Ka2? 

Notes: Most important one to learn, which is also the one that I can’t pronounce correctly the most. Need to put this into practice when I go hit up night markets! 

How much is it? 

Tao4 Rai3 Ka2 

This one

Un3 Nee2

How much is this one?

Un3 Nee2 Tao4 Rai3 Ka2?

Getting a Massage

1 Hour

Ngoon3 Che4-mong1

2 Hour

Song2 Che4-Mong1

Harder/Stronger

Kor3 Raeng Raeng1

Softer 

Kor3 Bao Bao1

Hurts 

Jeb

Too

Bai

Too Strong / Too Soft 

Raeng Bai / Bao Bai

Good

Ndi

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